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HANDBOOK 

THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 

A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE 
MUSEUM, ITS COLLECTIONS 
AND ITS WORK 





PRICE FIFTY CENTS 
MAY, MCMXXV 

























914 Ingalls Library 

THE CLEVELAND 
MUSEUM OF ART 






HANDBOOK OF 

THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 

EAST BOULEVARD AT BELLFLOWER ROAD 
IN WADE PARK. 


FIRST EDITION 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 
MAY, MCMXXV 




>91 
* » » 



VIEW OF THE MUSEUM FROM THE BOULEVARD 


10939 












INTRODUCTION 

This handbook is prepared to assist visitors in making a more 
or less systematic tour of the Museum* starting in the rotunda 
and following the galleries from I to XV as indicated. 

The policy of the Museum is to show at one time* only such 
objects as can be assembled attractively and consistently* and 
to change the arrangement at more or less frequent intervals. 
This means that few objects are always on exhibit. 

In selecting those works to be illustrated in this brief survey* 
an attempt has been made to select objects of special signifi¬ 
cance* and also to represent as widely as possible the various 
collections and donors. If objects illustrated should not happen 
to be on view and are of special interest* visitors can usually be 
shown them in storage* by applying to the General Office on 
the Ground Floor (see plan on page 70) during the office hours, 
9 a. m. to 5 p. M. on business days, Saturdays 9 a, m. to 1 p, m. 
On Sundays and holidays this is not usually possible. 

Frederic Allen Whiting* 


May* 1925, Director . 

CONTENTS 

View of Building Frontispiece 

Rotunda from Entrance Page 4 

Garden Court from Rotunda 5 

Armor Court from Rotunda 6 

Department of Early American Art* Gallery l 7 

Department of Decorative Art* Galleries II-III 10 

Department of Paintings, Galleries IV-VIII 22 

American Sculpture 37 

Special Exhibitions, Galleries IX-X 38 

Department of Prints and Drawings, Gallery XI 39 

Department of Oriental Art, Galleries XII-XIV 46 

Department of Egyptian Art, Gallery XV 55 

Department of Decorative Art* Armor Court 58 

Department of Classical Art* Rotunda 6i 

Department of Classical Art* Garden Court* Loggia 62 

Textile Study Room* Textiles 65 

Services to the Public 67 

History and Building 69 

Ground Floor Plan 70 

Exhibition floor plan 71 

Officers* Staff* Membership* etc, 72 





4 
























THE GARDEN COURT FROM THF, ROTUNDA 


5 











THE COURT OF TAPESTRIES AND ARMOR FROM THE ROTUNDA 


6 






DEPARTMENT OF EARLY AMERICAN ART, GALLERY I 



EARL1 AM KRICAN SILVER, XVI LX IX centuries. Gift of J. H. Wade, 1919-1921. 

The Colonial silversmiths represented in the Museum Collection cover a 
range of one hundred years from John Burt of Boston, bom in 1691, to 
Thomas C Coit of Connecticut, born in 1791. Included are such prominent 
names as that of Paul Revere, the patriot (1735-1818). 

The portrait of Nathaniel Hurd by Copley (see page 8) is interesting because 
he was the silversmith whose handsomely engraved tea pot is included in the 
important collection of silver lent by Hollis French of Boston. 


7 



















DEPARTMENT OF EARLY AMERICAN ART, GALLERY I 



NATHANIEL HURD (Boston Silversmith and Engraver). By John Singleton 
Copley, 1737-1815. The John Huntington Collection, 1916. 

The collection of paintings and handicrafts shown in Gallery 1 indicates that 
early in the Colonial days the instinct for artistic expression manifested 
itself in the settled parts of the country. Portraits such as those illustrated 
show the capable artists who were developed. Eleven painters born before the 
Revolution are represented in the collection. 

The portraits illustrated represent the work of the earliest artist (Hesse- 
lius, born 1682), of one in his prime at the time of the Revolution (Copley, 
born 1737), and of two still working during the War of 1812 (Jarvis, born 
1780 and Sully, 1783). 



DEPARTMENT OF EARLY AMERICAN ART, GALLERY I 




MRS, MARY HET SMITH. By Gustavus Hes&eliu$, 16811-1755^ The Hinman B. 
Hurlhut Collection, 1923. 


Left: OLD PAT, By John Wesley Jarvis, 1780-1834. Gift of J, H, Wade, 1916 .Right; 
CAPTAIN JEAN T. DAVID. Bv Thomas Sully, 1783-1872, The John Huntington 
Collection, 1916 q 






DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY II 



FRENCH ARMCHAIRS. XVIII century. Ltft: Louis XV style. Right: Louis XVI 
style. The Dudley P. Allen Collection, 1922. 



CONSOLE TABLE* French, XVIII centuryjLouis XVI Period. Anonymous Gift, 1922. 

This table is signed by Weisweiler who was a master "ebeniste” in Paris. 
The master furniture-maker before being permitted to sign his products had 
to prove bis skill and to be formally made a master by the guild of furniture 
makers. 


IO 














DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY II 



ENGLISH PORCELAIN, Chelsea, Bow, and Bristol, late XVIII century* The 
Mary Warden Harkness Collection. Bequeathed 1917. 

These delightful ornaments reflect the eighteenth century in their charm and 
frivolity. Such fanciful objects went well with the furniture of the period 
whether it was made by Chippendale, Sheraton, or Hepplewhite. The two 
upper figures are Bristol ware. The figure of Brittannia at the lower left is a 
rare example of Bow workmanship. The candle-stick is from the Chelsea 
factory after designs by Roubiliac. 


11 















DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



1 2 















DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



PANELS OF MORSE OR WALRUS IVORY. German, end of XI century. Gift 
of J + H. Wade, 1922. 

The use of figures as symbols, and the monumental effect gained thereby* 
shows the influence of Byzantium on Western European art.The central group 
represents Christ in an aureole supported by the symbols of the Evangelists, 
and flanked by angels. The other figures are the apostles. These plaques were 
made by the same artist who carved the famous altar at Melz in Germany. 





DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



CHAMPLEVE ENAMEL CROSS. French, Limoges, about 1200 A. D + Gift of 
J. EL Wade, 1923. 


In champlevc, the pattern was dug out and then filled with enamel. 

14 









DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



CENTRAL PANEL OF TABERNACLE. French* early XIV century. Workshop 
of the Tabernacles of the Virgin. Gift of Mr* and Mrs, John L. Severance and 
J. H* Wade, 1923. 

This ivory is a synthesis of early Gothic art at its best,In it there is linear grace* 
The delicate idealism of the figures is no longer merely symbolic* as in Byzan¬ 
tine and Romanesque art. There is humanity but not the realism seen in the 
art of succeeding centuries* The faces smile with a self-contained quality 
which later became affectation* Compare illustrations* pages 18 and 20* The 
plaque is one of the largest of its kind* and is ranked by Koechlin, the great 
French authority, as one of the finest of its group. 









DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



A TABLE FOUNTAIN OF SILVER GILT AND ENAMEL* French, end of 
XIV century. Gift of J. H, Wade, 1924. 

This fountain was unearthed in the garden of a palace in Constantinople* 
Wine or perfume was forced through the central support to the thirty-two 
outlets. The four outlets on the topmost level are lions and dragons* Below 
animal or human figures spouted on small paddle wheels which, in turning, 
rang tiny bells. The enamel subjects represent human or animal figures play¬ 
ing instruments or drinking from streams of water. They thus emphasize the 
two appeals of the fountain, the satisfaction of the ear and the satisfaction 
of thirst, 

16 



DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



MADONNA AND CHILD. Italian, Pisan, early XIV century, close in style to 
Giovanni Pisano. The John Huntington Collection, 1924. 

The early sculptors of Pisa, Niccola, and his son Giovanni Pisano, and their 
followers were the primary influences in freeing sculpture in Italy from the 
traditions of decadent Roman art. There is a classical severity in the face, 
but the draperies have a rhythmic flow of Gothic line. The figure has great 
vitality and life. It is wood polychromed and gilded. The figure is also re¬ 
markable because of its great size, being over all about seven feet in height. 
Wooden figures of this height and importance, so close to the style of Gio¬ 
vanni Pisano, himself, are unknown. Wooden sculpture,slightly later in period, 
is more common, and a fine example is shown in the same gallery as the 
figure illustrated. 

17 





DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



The heads show at their 
best the realistic trend of 
French Gothic sculpture be¬ 
fore it was overwhelmed by 
the classic influence of the 
Italian Renaissance. Michel 
Colombe was the great mas¬ 
ter of that period and for a 
short time under his in¬ 
fluence French sculpture in 
the region of the Loire got 
back the simplicity and ser¬ 
iousness of the earlier work. 
Casts of these two heads are 
in the Trocadero Museum 
in Paris* They are extremely 
close to two famous statues 
of the Virgin and Child, the 
Virgin of Fcouen and of 
Olivet in the Louvre* 



PAIR OF MARBLE HEADS. French, School of Michd Colombe, School of the 
Loire, beginning of XVI century* Gift of William G. Mather, 1921* 




DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



A characteristic type of Italian Renaissance sculpture was enamelled terra 
cotta introduced bv Luca della Robbia. In this the terra cotta was covered 
with a white enamel glaze* Simple monumental types and few colors were 
used* Andrea della Robbia, a nephew, in continuing the tradition, used more 
sentimentalized forms and more colors* An unillustrated relief by Benedetto 
Buglioni in the Museum collection shows that general type. The author of the 
piece illustrated above, Giovanni della Robbia, was Andrea's son. He turned 
towards realism, introducing landscape backgrounds and more colors. He 
often painted rather than enamelled terra cotta, as in this piece* 


THE SAMARITAN WOMAN AT THE WELL. Italian, Florentine, by Giovanni 
della Robbia, about 1510, Gift of Samuel Mather, 15)22. 











DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



EDUCATION OF THE VIRGIN. French, School of the Loire, early XVI century. 

Gift of G. J. Demotte, 1923. 

France retained her traditional Gothic art at this time. The growth of Italian 
Renaissance models intensified the use of the old forms for a few years at the 
beginning of the sixteenth century. Then the Renaissance swept everything 
before it. Characteristic of late Gothic art is an intense realism of feature and 
form. Note difference of feeling from Romanesque symbolical treatment, see 
pages 13-14, and idealistic treatment of early Gothic, see page 15. 

20 


DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



Italian, Sienese, first half XIV century. 



French, second half XV century* 



Italian, Bolognese, second half XIV century* 

THREE PAGES FROM ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS. Gift of J\ H. Wade, 1914* 

These illuminated miniatures are really paintings reduced in size so that they 
could form illustrations in the text of manuscripts* Manuscripts and minia¬ 
tures were made in most cases by specially trained monks in the monasteries* 


21 
























DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY IV 



MADONNA AND CHILD AND ADORING SAINTS. By Sano di Pietro, Italian, 
Sienese School, 1406-1481. Gift of Mrs. B, P, Bole, Mr. and Mrs. Guerdon S. Holden, 
Mrs. Windsor T- W T hite, and The Holden Lund, 1924. 


This shows the aloof, decorative, linear treatment which marked Sienese 
painting. It contrasts with the realistic quality of much of Florentine art. 

















DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY IV 



THE VIRGIN AND CHILD< By Francesco Botticini, 1446 (?)-1497, Italian, 
Florentine School. Gift of Mrs. Liberty E* Holden, 1916, 

Botticim was much influenced by Botticelli and shows this in his linear treat¬ 
ment and formalized color scheme- With his master he is a figure who is not 
in the main realistic stream of Florentine art. 




DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS* GALLERY IV 



MADONNA AND CHILD WITH SAINTS. By Lorenzo da San Severino, Italian, 
Umbrian School, died in 1503. Gift of Mrs, Liberty E* Holden, 1916. 

This altar piece with its figures against a background of dull gold contrasts 
with the sophistication of the sixteenth century manner seen in the next 
illustration. 


24 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY IV 



PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN AND HIS WIFE. By Giovanni Battista 
Moroni, Italian, Lombard School, 152025—‘1578. Gift of Mrs. Liberty E. Holden, 

1916. 

This double portrait is an example of accomplished technique and knowledge. 
The later Renaissance has learned its lesson well as far as realistic representa¬ 
tion goes. The details of jewelry and costume, the quality of textures, the 
character of the sitters are all ably felt. Characteristic of the school and of the 
artist is the background of light grey against which the silhouette counts 
effectively. It is the formal portrait of the day. 

Moroni was a pupil of Mo ret to of Brescia and both give a typical expression 
of the Lombard manner as it was localized and spread from the little city of 
Brescia. Moroni also bears the marks of his association with Lorenzo I .otto, 
an artist usually grouped with the Venetians. Contrast in the gallery this 
portrait with the Portrait of Giuliano De Medici by Salviati which has the 
characteristic form qualities of Florentine art at this time. 

In this gallery are many other examples of Italian painting. Important 
among them is a cassone panel, showing a horse race in the streets of Florence, 
which was made for a wedding celebrated between the members of two prom¬ 
inent Florentine families in the year 1418. It is the earliest known dated 
cassone panel. Other important pictures, early in date, are the small Floren¬ 
tine Crucifixion and the large Madonna and Child of the School of the 
Marches, Among the more important later pictures are the Entombment by 
Leandro Bassano and the Madonna and Child by some close follower of 
Leonardo da Vinci. 


*5 






DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY V 



PORTRAIT OF A LADY. By Paulus Moreelse, Dutch, 1571-1638. Gift of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. H, Wade, 1916. 



TRIUMPH OF THE HOLY SACRAMENT OVER FOLLY. By Peter Paul 
Rubens, Flemish, 1577-1640. Gift of Mr. and Mrs, j\ H, Wade, 1916. 


26 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY V 



MADONNA AND CHILD. By Frans Floris, Flemish, 1517-1570. Gift of Mr. and 
Mrs* J. H. Wade, 1916. 



LANDSCAPE. By Claude Lo train, French, 16001682. Gift of Mrs. liberty E. 
Holden, 1916. 


27 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES V-VII 




MRS. COLLYEAR AS “LESBIA AND HER DEAD BIRD.” By Sir Joshua 
Reynolds, English, 1723-1792* Gift of J. H. Wade, 1920* 


CARTHAGE. By J. W. M. Turner, English, 1775-1851, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. J. H, 
Wade, 1916* 


28 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES V-VIl 




TANNHAUSER. By Henri Fantin-Latour, French, 1836-1904, Gift of Mr. and 
f Mrs, J. H. Wade, 1916. 


ARABS RESTING, By Eugene Delacroix s French, 1798-1863. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. H. Wade, 1916. 


29 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS* GALLERIES V-VU 




MOONLIGHT AT MIDNIGHT, By jean Charles Cazin, French, 1841-1901, The 
Charles W. Hark ness Collection, 1923. 


SUMMER. By Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, French, 1816-1898, Gift of Mr. and 
Mrs, J, H. Wade, 1916. 


3 ° 




DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES V-VTT 



AU BORD DE LA MER. By Eugene Boudin, French, 1835-1898. Gift of Mrs. D. Z. 
Norton, 1917, 



LES BERGERS (THE SHEPHERDS). By Rene Menard, French, J 862- 
Gift of Ralph King, 1921. 


3 1 



DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES VII-VIII 



PORTRAIT OF MISS DORA WHEELER. By William Merritt Chase, American, 
1E49-1916. Gift of Mrs. Boudinot Kdth, 1911. 

This portrait by Chase was painted about the year 1883. In that year it was 
awarded a Gold Medal in the Internationale Kunstaustellung in Munich and 
was shown at the Paris Salon. Chase spent his student years in Munich where 
many of the leading figures of his generation received their training. Twacht- 
man and Duveneck were studying there at the same time. The Venetian Girl 
of Duveneckfs illustrated on the next page must have been painted just after 
he left Munich for further study in Italy. American art received another new 
emphasis about the same period from the men influenced by the Bar biz on 
group in France. Homer Martin felt this very strongly and it can be seen in 
his picture. Wild Coast, Newport, page 34, and in the earliest work of Henry 
Golden Dearth, page 35. Winslow Homer, however, is purely American. No 
one had ever painted the sea as he saw it and Early Morning After Storm at 
Sea, page 34, is ranked in his own mind as his greatest rendition of this sub^ 
ject. The work of George Bellows and Rockwell Kent follows in Homer’s 
footsteps. They are American in viewpoint and feeling and are representative 
of the best of the present day tendencies. 








DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES VII-VIII 



VENETIAN GIRL, By Frank Duveneck, American, 1848-1919. Gift of Mrs* 
Henry A, Everett in memory of her daughter, Dorothy Burnham Everett, 1922* 


33 


DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES VII-VIII 



WILD COAST, NEWPORT By Homer Martin, American, 1836-1897. Gift of 
Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. 1923, 



EARLY MORNING AFTER STORM AT SEA. By Winslow Homer, American, 
1836-1910. Gift of J. H. Wade, 1924. 


34 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS* GALLERIES VII-VIII 



HEAD OF A BOY. By George Fuller, American, 1822-1884, The Dorothy Burnham 
Everett Collection* 1925. 



THE STUBBLE FIELD, By Henry Golden Dearth, American* 1864^1918. Gift of 
George E. Gage and Frederic S. Porter* 3924, 


35 








DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES VII-VIII 



STAG AT SHARKEY'S, By George Bellows, American, 1882-1925. The Hinman 
B. Hurlbut Collection, 1922, 










AMERICAN SCULPTURE 



Left: HEAD OF LINCOLN. By Gutzon Borglum, American, 1867- Gift of 
Mrs, Salmon P. Halle, 1922* Right: HEAD OF A WOMAN. By Gaston Lachaise, 
American, 1882- The Hinman B. Hurlbut Collection, 1924. 



Left: AMOR CARITAS. By Augustus Saint-Gaudens, American, 1848-1907, The 
Dorothy Burnham Everett Collection, 1924. Right: THE BACCHANTE. By 
Frederick William MacMonnics, American, 1863- Anonymous gift, 1919, 


37 













GALLERIES IX AND X 


SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS 

These two important galleries are set aside for temporary exhi¬ 
bitions which are scheduled throughout the year for periods of 
from four to six weeks each* In this way the Museum is able to 
keep the public informed as to the art movements of the past 
and present more adequately than would be possible from the 
permanent collections alone* 

The Museum wishes to encourage a wider appreciation of the 
work of American artists and to this end has the following 
annual exhibitions: The work of Cleveland Artists and 
Craftsmen; Contemporary American Oil Painting; Contempo¬ 
rary American Water Colors* 

The importance of the other exhibitions of paintings is indi¬ 
cated by the following list from among those held in recent years: 

Selected canvases from the Foreign Section of the Twenty- 
second International Exhibition held at Carnegie Institute; 
paintings by Ramon and Valentin de Zubiaurre; paintings by 
Zuloaga and Sorolla; and sculpture by Lachaise and Bourdelle; 
paintings by Edouard Manet, Berthe Morisot, and Pierre 
Auguste Renoir; and paintings by the Taos Society of Artists* 
The exhibitions of prints and drawings in these galleries are 
usually devoted to the work of special groups, to particular 
subjects, to prints made by same process, etc* Although the 
larger part of the material comes from the Museum's perma¬ 
nent collection, much is borrowed from collectors and dealers* 
Exhibitions of oriental subjects are largely confined to 
Chinese and Japanese painting, Japanese wood block color 
prints, with an occasional exhibition of contemporary work. 

THE GARDEN COURT 

The Garden Court furnishes a needed oasis, in which Museum 
objects are shown amid growing plants* These together with 
the splash of water in the pool provide an antidote to Museum 
fatigue and give refreshment to mind and eye, sending the 
visitor back to the galleries with renewed interest. 

In the balcony of the Court is located the splendid McMyler 
organ upon which frequent recitals are given under ideal con¬ 
ditions for the enjoyment of music, 

38 


DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, GALLERY XI 



ST. ANTHONY TORMENTED BY THE DEVILS. Engraved by Schongauer, 
German, before I440-I491. The Dudley P. Alien Collection, 1923. 

The collection is composed of several thousand prints dating from the begin¬ 
nings of the art early in the fifteenth century to the present day. A selection 
of these is always on view in this gallery and special exhibitions are held 
from time to time in adjoining galleries. The prints not on exhibition and 
a large collection of reproductions may be consulted in the Print Room on 
the ground floor. The visitor's attention is particularly called to the cases'of 
material illustrating the various graphic processes, in the corridor leading’to 
the Print Room. 


39 








DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, GALLERY XI 



Left: THE DANCE OF DEATH, The Merchant. Woodcut by Holbein, German, 
1497-1543. Gift of the Print Clubj 1922. Right: TAROCCHI CARO. One of the set 
of fifty Anonymous Italian Engravings of the XV Century, The Dudley P. Allen 
Collection* 1924. 

Both these are among the most famous series of early prints. 



Left; VIRGIN AND CHILD. Engraved bv Schcmgauer* German, before 1440-1491. 
The Ralph King Collection, 1924. HOLY FAMILY WITH THF. DRAGON 

FLY. Engraved by Durer, German, 1471-1528. The Ralph King Collection, 1925. 
























DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, GALLERY XI 



THE ENTOMBMENT* Engraved by Mantegna, Italian, 1431-1505. The 
Ralph King CoJIcetion, 1914. 



- ; -- \t\ 


WEt- 

Jf] 




ADORATION OF THE KINGS. Engraved by Lucas van Leyden, Dutch, 1494-1533 
The Charles W. Harkness Collection, 1923. 


4 * 





DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS* GALLERY XI 



BACCHANALIAN, Etched by Fragonard, French, 1732-j 806. The Dudley P. 
Allen Collection, 1924. 

Compare the freedom of the etched line with the more formal line of the 
engravings on the preceding pages. 



ONE OF THE BULLFIGHT SERIES, Etching and Aquatint by Goya, Spanish, 
1746-1828. The Charles W. Harkness Collection, 1923. 


42 








department of prints and drawings* GALLERY XI 



Left: SUPPER AT EMMAUS, Etched by Rembrandt, Dutch, 1606-1669. Gift 
of The Print Club, 1922, Right: ST. CATHERINE IN THE CLOUDS, Etched 
by Rubens, Flemish, 1577-1640. The Ralph Xing Collection, 1923, 


Rembrandt, by common consent, is the greatest etcher that ever lived. He 
made more than three hundred plates, Rubens etched only three. 



Left- PAINTER'S STUDIO. Etched by van Ostade, Dutch, 1610-1685. 
Right: MNTASIES; SATYR FAMILY. Etched by G. B. Tiepolo, Italian, about 
1695-1770. Both gifts of Leonard C. Hanna, Jr., 1924. 


4 3 











DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS* GALLERY XI 



ANNIE HADEN* Etched by Whistler, American, 1834-1903. The Ralph King 
Collection, 1922. 

Whistler said he would rest his reputation on this etching. The Whistler 
etchings and lithographs are among the most important items in the print 
collection. 


44 












DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, GALLERY XI 



PIERROT* Drawing by Gavarni, French, 1804-1866. The Dudley P. Allen Collec¬ 
tion, 1923* 

The collection of old and modern drawings is supplemented by several 
thousand reproductions which may be found in the Print Room* 


45 























DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XII 



TERRA COTTA HEAD OF BUDDHA. I-III Centuries, A. D* The Dudley P. Alien 
Collection, 1922. 

A typical example of the hybrid art, usually called “Graeco-Buddhist,” 
which grew up in North India in the centuries which followed Alexander the 
Great's conquest in 326 ICC. The Hellenistic tradition spread, in a diluted form, 
across the Trade Route to China and thence to Japan by way of Korea* 

In this gallery are gathered the arts of peoples who have inhabi ted that part 
of the world's surface which lies both east of Constantinople and west of 
Suez as far as South China* This vast territory includes Egypt since the Arab 
conquest, Morocco, Moorish Spain and Sicily, as well as Turkey, Arabia, 
Persia, India, Tibet, Siam and French Indo-China. 


46 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, CALLERY XII 



HEAD OF A KHMER DIVINITY. Possibly a posthumous royal portrait, Khmer, 

XI Century. The Dudley P, Allen Collection, 1923, 

The Khrners built up a remarkable civilization, lasting for more than eight 
centuries, in the depths of the tropical jungles, in what is now modern Cam¬ 
bodia, a part of French Indo-China, The temples and monuments left by 
these forgotten people are among the most extensive and impressive ruins in 
the world. This head comes from Angkor, the ancient capital. 


47 


DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XII 



PARVATI, THE CHIEF FEMALE HINDU DEITY. South India, XIV-XV 
Centuries. Gift of j\ H, Wade, 1924. 

This little bronze was made to be carried in religious processions. The pro¬ 
portions of the figure are based on the unit of measure, the “tala/* the dis¬ 
tance between the base of the headdress and the point of the chin. 


48 




DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XIII 



Left ; STELE OF A BUDDHIST TRINITY. Chinese, Wei Dynasty, dated 537 
A h D. The John Huntington Collection, 1924, Right: KWANYlN, Chinese, 
T'ang Dynasty, 618-907 A. D. The Ralph King Collection, 1915* 



Left: POTTERY HEAD OF A LOHAN* One of the Sixteen Disciples of Buddha. 
Chinese, T'ang Dynasty, 618-907. The Worcester R. Warner Collection, 1917. 
Right: HEAD OF A BODHISATTVA. Chinese, North Wei Dynasty, 386-535* 
The Ralph King Collection, 1915. 


49 









DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GARDEN COURT 



The base, which is dated 627 -A, although contemporary, does not belong 
to the figure. Note the dignity, repose, and aloofness of all Chinese sculpture. 


5° 




DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XIII 








DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XIV 



MORTUARY POTTERY, CELADON WARE. Excavated near Sunto, the ancient 
capital. Korean, Korai Period, 920-1392 A, D. The John L. Severance Collection, 
1923. 



BUDDHIST TRIPTYCH OF GILDED BRONZE. Korean, Chosen Period, 1393^ 
1910. The Worcester R. Warner Collection, 1918, 




DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XIV 





GILDED LACQUER FIGURE OF YAKUSHI BUDDHA, GOD OF MEDICINE. 
Japanese, Tokugawa Period, 1700-1850. The Worcester R. Warner Collection* 1915* 


The annals of Chinese art go back about three thousand years. In japan 
there was virtually no art prior to the introduction of Buddhism in the 
sixth century A. D. 

Oriental art is less obvious and less progressive, though more symbolic, 
than Western art. 


53 






>wIl5 


DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART* GALLERY XIV 



SWORD GUARIL (Tsuba) Jap¬ 
anese, Tokugawa Period, 1700- 
1850. The D. Z. Norton Collectirni, 
1919. BRONZE MIRROR. Jap¬ 
anese* Fuji wara Period, 900-H00. 
The D.Z. Norton Collection, 1917. 



Mirrors were often buried with the dead to ward off evil spirits. 



Left: A LESSON IN PENMANSHIP. Japanese wood block color print by Utamaro. 
Late XVIII Century. Gift of J. H. Wade, 1911. Right: KWANNON bearing a lotus 
dais on which to receive the faithful souls. Wood and Lacquer. Japanese, Kamakura 
Period, 1200-1400. The Ralph King Collection, 1919* 


54 





DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN ART* GALLERY XV 



DOOR OF THE SOUL, OR KA< Egyptian, XVIII Dynasty, 3580-1350 B. C. The 
Edward S« Harkness Collection, 1921. 


While European art is based on the convention of representing only what 
can be seen at one time, Egyptian art is based on the convention of represent¬ 
ing as much as possible, each part—eye, face, shoulders, in the position 
easiest to see. The inscription starts in the center of the lintel and reads in 
both directions, giving a much better balance than a European inscription 
which reads from left to right. 

























DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN ART, GALLERY XV 




<6 


Left: LION HEADED GODDESS, SEKHMET. Right: PORTRAIT HEAD 
OF A KING. Egyptian, XVIII Dynasty, 7580-1350 £L C. The John Huntington 
Collection, 1916 and I9I4. 

Egyptian sculpture in the round is primarily monumental. It is frequently in very hard stone* 
like this syenite and diorite* giving the impression of eternal duration* 







DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN ART, GALLERY XV 



« £ 
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< B 
W 2 
I m 

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< 3 

3 4 

£- 
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00 
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m £T 


ai s*. 
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57 


Egyptian art after 3000 B. C. is not primitive but highly developed. The sculptor's sketches are 
as full of type character as any modern cartoon and they reveal much knowledge and skill. The 
Portrait of a King shows as high ability used in thy service of regal elegance. 






DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, ARMOR COURT 



RQNDACHES. Spanish and German, XVI Century. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Severance* 191:6. 

Examples of fine workmanship in the Severance Collection of Arms and 
Armor. 


58 


DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, ARMOR COURT 



59 



DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, ARMOR COURT 



ESPALIER OR SHOULDER PLATES, Probably- by the Milanese Armorer 
Negroli. Italian, XVI Century. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John L. Severance, 1916, 


60 












DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART, ROTUNDA 



ATHLETE ATTRIBUTED TO MYRON, Greek, Type of V Century, B. C, The 
John Huntington Collection, 1924. 

An ancient marble copy made in the early years of the Roman empire after a 
Greek bronze statue in the style of Myron , the most famous sculptor of 
athletes of the fifth century B. C,, popularly known through his Discus 
Thrower. The supports were of course unnecessary in the original bronze. 
There are practically no restorations. 


6l 






DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ARTj GARDEN COURT, LOGGIA 




GREEK HEAD. Type of V Century, B. C. Gift of Mrs. Leonard C. Hanna, 1923* 
Marked with the cool clarity of the age preceding Phidias but also a softness 
suggestive of a later date. A part of the nose is restored in plaster. 


GREEK POTTERY. VII-V Century, B. C. Gifts of J. H. Wade, Mrs. L. C. Hanna, 
and The Dudley P. Alien Collection, 1923-1924. 

62 









DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART, GARDEN COURT, LOGGIA 



GREEK GRAVE RELIEF, about 400 B. C. Gift of Mrs. Leonard C, Hanna, 1924. 

The grave monuments of Athens afford some of the finest expressions of 
Greek spirit. 


63 




DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART* GARDEN COURT, LOGGIA 



ROMAN TORSO OF APOLLO. 27 B. G-14 A. D. Gift of ]. H. Wade, 1924. 


Roman sculpture of the time of Augustus was more elegant than the earlier 
Greek sculpture, not so simple, not so profound, but lovely in line and surface. 


64 


TEXTILE STUDY ROOM, TEXTILES 



Coptic, V-VI Century*. 

The John Huntington Collection, 
1916. 


Italian, XV Century. 

The Dudley P. Allen Collection, 
191R, 



Persian, XVI Century. 

The J. H, Wade Collection, 1914. 


Persian, about 1500. 

The J. H. Wade Collection, 1916. 


The Textile collection consists of an important group of pieces representative 
of historic types in many periods. They can be consulted under supervision 
in the textile room. 


65 














TEXTILE STUDY ROOM, LACES 




THREE PIECES OF LACE. From The Ellen Garretson Wade Memorial Collec¬ 
tion, 1923, 

The Lace collection consists of the important pieces which form The Ellen 
Garretson Wade Memorial Collection presented by J. H* Wade, Jr., Garret- 
son Wade, and Mrs* E. B. Greene* In addition, J. H. Wade gave a large group 
of type pieces. Other donors have added fine examples* The upper piece is 
early XVIII century, fiat Venetian point- the middle flounce is of the same 
period, but made in Brussels. The lower one is Milanese tape lace, with 
scenes from the story of Joseph, 


66 







SERVICES TO THE PUBLIC 


THE LIBRARY 

The Library of the Museum contains books, magazines, 
photographs and lantern slides dealing mainly with fine and 
applied art. Books are not lent, but slides and photographs may 
be borrowed for purposes of instruction. 

THE EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

The opportunities offered to the public by the Educational 
Department may be briefly summarized as follows: 

Work With Adults —Clubs, conventions, and other adult 
groups may arrange for guidance in the Museum by appoint¬ 
ment. Lectures are given Friday evening at eight-fifteen, and 
Sunday afternoon at four o’clock during the winter months. 
Certain of these are arranged by the Department of Musical 
Arts. Courses on art and musical appreciation are provided for 
college students. 

Work With Children —By an arrangement with the Board of 
Education all fifth and sixth grade classes visit the Museum on 
schedule. High schools, lower grades, and out-of-town classes 
may receive instruction by appointment. 

Saturday Morning Classes —Drawing, modeling, and singing 
classes for members’ children are held each Saturday morning 
during the school season, as is a free advanced drawing class 
to which children are admitted through competition. 

Entertainment for Children —Entertainments are held in the 
Lecture Hall from October to June at two o’clock each Satur¬ 
day afternoon; and on Sunday afternoon at four o’clock there 
is a “Museum Hour” for little children and one for older boys 
and girls. This “Hour” is devoted to story telling or talks with 
lantern slides. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSICAL ART 

The Department of Musical Arts is maintained by an endow¬ 
ment fund created in memory of P. J. McMyler by Mrs. Mc- 
Myler and her daughters, who also gave the Museum organ 
as a memorial. Organ recitals are given in the Garden Court, 
other musical events in the Lecture Hall. In addition to lectures 
held in the Museum, extension work is carried on with certain 
educational institutions of the city. Cooperation is maintained 
with the Educational Department in its Friday evening and 
Sunday afternoon lectures and Saturday afternoon entertain¬ 
ments. Appreciation cl asses for Members’ children are conducted. 

67 


PUBLICATIONS 


The first publication of the Museum was the Catalogue of 
The Inaugural Exhibition of The Cleveland Museum of Art, 
printed in 1916. The large paper edition, limited to 1000 copies, 
is fully illustrated, and an interesting historical resum£ precedes 
the section devoted to each collection. A few of these catalogues 
are still available at $3.00 a volume. (Size 9L2 x 12%; 360 
pages; 145 full page illustrations). 

The Catalogue of the Severance Collection of Arms and 
Armor, by Helen Ives Gilchrist, a beautifully printed and 
illustrated book, has recently been published by the Museum. 
The text is so complete that it may be regarded as a history of 
armor; and an introduction by Bash ford Dean, Curator of 
Armor of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, adds much to the 
value of the book. The edition is limited to three hundred, 
with a few copies only for sale at $40.00 a volume. (Size 9 x 12; 
289 pages; 26 photogravure plates; 7 text drawings and many 
armorers’ marks by Theodore Sizer). 

Japanese Sculpture of the Suiko Period, by Langdon Warner, 
is a handsomely printed volume from the Yale University Press. 
It covers the art of the seventh century which laid the foundation 
for Buddhist art in Japan. Examples of sculpture in the Suiko 
period are so rare that it has been possible to illustrate them all. 
The present price is $30.00, to be advanced to $40.00 when two 
hundred copies have been sold. (Size 13 x 16; 77 pages; 145 
full page plates). 

At the sales desk the following publications are also sold: 
The Catalogue of the Collection of Paintings Presented to The 
Cleveland Museum of Art by Mrs. Liberty E. Holden, an illus¬ 
trated description of the Museum’s collection of Italian Primi¬ 
tives compiled by Miss Stella Rubinstein, price postpaid, 
twenty-five cents; The Handbook of The Severance Collection 
of Arms and Armor, fully illustrated, with preface and historical 
introduction by Helen Ives Gilchrist, price postpaid fifty cents; 
The Museum Handbook, which aims to make the Museum 
known to the public in outline, and gives a description of some of 
the most important objects in the collections, price postpaid fifty 
cents; and the Bulletin of The Cleveland Museum of Art, 
published ten times a year as a record of the progress of the 
Museum and its collections, price postpaid $1.00 a year, single 
copies ten cents. 


68 


HISTORY AND BUILDING OF THE CLEVELAND 
MUSEUM OF ART 

The Cleveland Museum of Art grew out of the creation of 
trusts by John Huntington and Horace Kelley, “for the purpose 
of establishing and maintaining in the City of Cleveland a 
gallery and museum of art for the promotion and cultivation of 
art in said City.” 

The first Building Committee was formed in 1905. Actual 
work on the building was commenced in May, 1913, on the site 
in Wade Park presented by Mr, and Mrs. J. H. Wade. The 
Museum was incorporated as a corporation not for profit in 
1913, following the appointment of Frederic Allen Whiting as 
Director, and on June 6, 1916, the building was formally dedi¬ 
cated and opened to the public. 

Building —The building is 300 feet long and 120 feet broad. 
It is classical in style, the Ionic order being used in the south 
portico and the end pavilions. The cost was about $1,250,000.00. 

Marble —The exterior is of white Georgia marble. A variety 
of marbles is used in the interior. The dado on main floor, the 
rotunda columns, and handrails of the main stairs are of Char- 
len marble, from Maryland. The walls of foyer and corridor on 
ground floor are of English vein, Italian marble, imported from 
Italy. All marble floors in the building are of Tennessee marble. 
Walls of the Armor Court are of Grey Canyon sandstone, 
quarried at Amherst, Ohio. The four columns supporting the 
Garden Court balcony are of Egyptian granite, with Carrara 
marble capitals. They were probably part of an ancient Roman 
temple, and were cut down about 1780 or 1790 for use in the 
Torlonia Palace in Rome, the marble capitals being carved at 
that time to fit them. 

Lighting System —The gallery lighting was planned by a 
committee of experts who conducted extended experiments at 
Nela Park. The south galleries and the courts are lighted from 
above. In diffusing chambers between the upper and lower 
gallery skylights, are metal louvres which control the sunlight. 
Daylight lamps in scoop-shaped reflectors below these louvres 
supply artificial light, which is directed on the gallery walls. 

Ventilation —The ventilation is indirect. Air is taken from 
the roof, washed, brought to the proper degree of heat and 
humidity, and forced to all parts of the building. 

69 



Ground Floor Plan 


GROUND STORY plan THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 

























































































Exhibition Floor Plan 


THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 


































































THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 

OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION 
President, J. H, Wade 

Vice Presidents, Ralph King, John L. Severance, Wm. G. Mather 
Treasurer, John Huntington Hard Secretary pro iem r F. A. Whiting 


BOARD OF TRUSTEES 


Leonard C Hanna, J 
John H. Hord 
Ralph King 
Samuel Mather 
William G* Mather 

J- 


Charles L. Murfey 
D. Z, Norton 
F. F. Prentiss 
Willliam B* Sanders 
John L. Severance 
. Wade 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Ratph King J. L. Severance 

J. H* Wade W. B. Sanders 

ACCESSIONS COMMITTEE 
The President and Director, ex-ofjidis 
L. C. Hanna, Jr. Ralph King W. G- Mather 
D. Z. Norton John L. Severance 

ADVISORY COUNCIL 


The President of Western Reserve University 
The President of Case School of Applied Science 


Charles T* Brooks 
Charles F. Brush 

E. S. Burke, Jr. 
Ralph M. Coe 
H. G. Dalton 

F. E* Drury 


Myron T* Herrick 
Guerdon S. Holden 
William R. Huntington 
Mrs. H. H. Johnson 
Amos B. McNairy 
Earl W. Oglebay 


Mrs* Henry A. Everett Kenyon V, Painter 


Paul L. Feiss 
Edward B. Greene 
Salmon P* Halle 
H. M. Hanna, Jr 
Edward S. Harkness 
E* L. 


James Parmelec 
Frederic S. Porter 
Mrs. F* F* Prentiss 
Ambrose Swasey 
Worcester R. Warner 
Whittemore 


STAF F OF THE MUSEUM 
Director, Frederic Allen Whiting 
Curator of Decorative Arts s William M. Milliken 
Assistant in Textiles, Gertrude Underhill 
Acting Curator of Pain ting,William M, Milhken 
Curator of Oriental Art, Theodore Sizer 
Curator of Prints, Theodore Sizer, Assistants 
Leona B. Prasse and Richard R. Beatty 
Curator of Classical Art, Rossiter Howard 
Assistant to the Director, Olive C* Whiting 
Secretary to the Director, Ethel F. Cook 
Registrar, Eleanor R. Sackett 
Cashier, Isabel Bloomberg 


Curator of Educational Work, Rossiter Howard 
Assistants, Gertrude Under hi 11 , Louise M. Dunn, 
Ruth F* Ruggles, Katharine Gibson, Alice W. 
Howard, Marguerite Bloomberg* Adviser,Henry 
Turner Bailey 

Curator of Musical Arts, Douglas Moore 
Assistant, Arthur W. Quimby 


Librarian, Nell G, Sill 

Assistants, Harriet H, Thwing, Irene J. Kaul 
Photography and Printing, E. A. Ruggles 
Membership and Publicity Secretary, I.T, Frary 
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 
John W, McCabe 


MEMBERSHIP 

Foundation Benefactors contribute or 


devise $500,000 

Endowment Benefactors contribute or 
devise * 100,000 

Benefactors contribute or devise 25,000 

Fellows in Perpetuity contribute or 
devise 5,000 

Fellows for Life contribute i,coo 

Life Members contribute 100 

Fellows pay annually 100 

Organization Members pay annually 50 

Sustaining Members pay annually 25 

Annual Members pay annually 10 


Full particulars may be had upon request. 
ADMISSION 

Open daily from 9 a*m. to 5 p*m., except as 
follows: 

Wednesday 9a.n1, to 10 p.m* 

Sunday 1 p.m* to 10 p*m« 

Free days: Sunday,Wednesday, Saturday and 
public holidays. Friday also free from 7 to 10 
p.m. during the lecture season* 

On other days an admission fee of 25 cents is 
charged to all except members, holders of 
complimentary tickets and children of school age. 
Closed all day on July 4, Thanksgiving Day 
and December 25* 


GALLERY ADVICE 

The members of the staff are prepared to assist 
visitors, but their many duties make it advisable 
that appointments be arranged in advance, 
LIBRARY 

A reference library of works on art, with cur¬ 
rent art magazines, will be found on the ground 
floor. Open from 9 to 5 daily except Sunday; 
from October to May, Sunday 3 to 6, Wed¬ 
nesday 7 to 9. 

GIFTS TO THE MUSEUM 
The Director will be pleased to discuss desirable 
gifts,, or ways of assisting in the work of the 
Museum, with friends who may desire to help 
in this way. 

WHEEL-CHAIRS 

For the convenience of visitors wheel-chairs are 
available. No charge is made unless an atten¬ 
dant is desired, for which service 50 cents an 
hour is charged. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Catalogues, photographs, postcards, Bulletins , 
etc. which are for sale may be found at the desk 
at the main entrance. Orders by mail are invited. 

LUNCH ROOM 

The Lunch Room at the ground floor entrance is 
open to the public from 12 m. to 5 p. m.